Educational Freedom – a Disclaimer

I post often about home education, and will continue to do so. Some folks wonder if I am claiming that home education is the solution for everybody. Far from the case. I'm pretty sure I've written more than a few posts about free-market education. Click on "tooley" and/or "sudbury" in the tag cloud, for example,… Continue reading Educational Freedom – a Disclaimer

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An Unschooler Goes To College . . .

After 2 years at a community college, Cheri entered UNCC as a junior. She was only 17 years old, which nonplussed more than a few classmates, most of whom were over 20 years past their first wails. Cheri did her best to help other classmates past their rough spots, becoming the "go to girl" as… Continue reading An Unschooler Goes To College . . .

Lost Tools of Learning

Larry Holmgren, my frequent partner in the game of Go, is a professional educator. He was kind enough to relay some thoughts from Dorothy Sayers' Lost Tools of Learning 1947 lecture, which raise many interesting questions. Dorothy Sayers' prefatory remarks include: When we think about the remarkably early age at which the young men went… Continue reading Lost Tools of Learning

Round Peg, Meet The Hole of Bureaucratic Craziness

Many states construe home education as a variety of "private schooling," with mandatory attendance reporting and mandatory curriculum requirements. But what is "attendance," when a child learns 365 days per year? What is "curriculum" when the natural curiosity of a child is unbounded? Some requirements are even sillier. In North Carolina, since home education can… Continue reading Round Peg, Meet The Hole of Bureaucratic Craziness

What If We Respect Children?

Democratic Free Schools basically apply the ideas of what we might describe as "classical democratic liberalism" to education. The children have real rights; they have a real vote in real decisions; they are autonomous. In short, they experience day-to-day life in a coherent, consistent classically liberal society, or as near as a school can match… Continue reading What If We Respect Children?